Go Slow Ptbo Traffic Calming Pilot Project

Keeping our community safer with #GoSlowPtbo

A card board and duct tape sign on an Otonabee Ward residential street asking drivers to slow down.
Residents have taken to making their own signs, imploring drivers to please slow down.

One of the key issues that I have heard about consistently from constituents is the need to find a way to keep our neighbourhoods safer by encouraging drivers to slow down.

I’m all about safe roads for everyone. 

That is why I am launching the #GoSlowPtbo initiative to help improve neighbourhood safety for us all in Peterborough.

This has been an issue close to my heart for a long time and I am pleased to roll out this pilot project for the citizens of Otonabee Ward while inviting residents across the city of Peterborough to also get involved – safer roads know no ward boundaries.

Couple walking by a Go Slow, Older Folks at Play sign
Safer roads know no ward boundaries. Dave and Ellen McLeod enjoy walking in their neighbourhood in the Avenues and support initiatives like traffic calming that improve safety for pedestrians.

The idea for this campaign was sparked by a constituent who passed along some information about a similar campaign in Toronto.  I thought it made sense to introduce this kind of project in Peterborough.

How can you participate?

The dedicated and skilled team assembled for this project has produced lawn signs to highlight the #GoSlowPtbo safety campaign, and each sign features a different message so that you can decide which one best suits your neighbourhood. To prevent sign fatigue – ignoring a sign because it has been in one place too long – engage with your neighbours and switch-up sign locations so that the message continues to look new and different to drivers.

Find out more about requesting a lawn sign by going to: Projects-GoSlowPtbo.

Thank you for supporting safe streets in Peterborough, let’s all #GoSlowPtbo.

More facts on the efficacy of lawn signs 

Oceanside California initiated a sign campaign focused on protecting children.  The average vehicle velocity dropped 16% on streets where neighbours placed signs on their lawns (2001: Urban Transportation Monitor).

Reducing speed helps drivers avoid accidents.  A UK study demonstrated that if vehicles were driven 1.6 km/h slower, collisions would be reduced by 6% (2000: Road Safety Division, Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, United Kingdom).

One thought on “Go Slow Ptbo Traffic Calming Pilot Project”

  1. Hi Kim,

    My personal take is that if traffic was reduced to 40km/h then people would go 50 and 60 rather than the 80 km/h I regularly see up my street.

    So great to see you on Chex this am promoting this.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *